Personl Experience of Using Crest White strips

Having white and beautiful teeth is everyone dream but paying for expensive professional procedures is not for anyone, that is why our last hope are the home teeth whitening products and as an user of Crest White strips  I will review this product so you can see that if you follow the usage description regularly the results are positive!

I had tried many products I have saw on commercials but most are too cheap to work and others are just pure commercial fakes which mean those only weaken your teeth instead of giving you whitening feature. Thanks to one of my friends I came close to the Crest White strips  which I found it to be not that cheap but very easy to use with positive results I saw from user reviews, for this reason I tried it out.

For 40$ I bought the package which included 84 white strips, 42 for upper teeth and 42 for lower strips. That means if you follow the guideline which means daily usage you have enough strips for whole month and if you use it regularly like me there will be positive results, my teeth became 2 shades whitener after first 1 month!

How did I use it? First I prepare my teeth which means I did not brush them before else the white strips do not work, remember that. Next thing I did was to peel off the strip and then hardly press it and place the strip on my teeth, both upper and lower. Before I did that I also avoided any coffee, soda or tea, usually 1 hour before for maximum results. I left the strip for 30 minutes on my teeth to work and then I put them down and brushed my teeth. Doing this twice per day once in the morning and once at night I saw first results already after 1 week after usage which is incredible!

You can see there are many users who had positive results after using the Crest Whitestrips but only those who actually used it twice or once per day regularly, not those that tried it twice per week and hoped for best results. 

Have a look at more user reviews and best prices on the Crest Whitestrips site. Here you will find Crest white strips coupon. Check this out.

UXPA 2014 Julian Hirst - User Experience Design

The Futureheads UX team interviewed Julian Hirst, CEO of Tobias & Tobias, ahead of the UXPA 2014 International Conference in London. In this video, he shares…

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Workflow Design – Using User Interface Design Conventions

This article is based on the usability newsletter by Jakob Nielsen

When creating user interface designs for websites and applications it is important to think of the use cases necessary for users to accomplish tasks. Good user interface design is not just a matter of creating a page with the correct layout and pretty UI design elements but also the interactions and workflows that are required to achieve tasks. According to usability guru Jakob Nielsen workflows are more abstract because they are not as visually tangible as, say, a tab button or a link but they are crucial in getting the user experience right.

Getting Workflow Design Right Using User Interface Design Conventions

One of the ways of doing this is to match a users expectation of a user interface design by having things happen when a user would expect them. This is where existing web and user user interface design conventions come in handy. A common example of such a web user interface design convention would be the use of a logo on the top left of a website that also serves as a link to the homepage. There can be a temptation among certain UI designers to be unique and aesthetically different but this should never come at the expense of usability. Web users are notoriously fickle with an attention span that is measured in milliseconds.

Getting Workflow Design Right Using Instructions

The other way of having things happen when users expect them is to provide clear and concise instructions. However this needs to be done with care because instructions negatively impact user experience by diverting from a user’s main task.

Progressive disclosure is also important in making sure instructions have the lowest footprint possible on a user interface design. Progressive disclosure is when the most important options are included in the user interface design for simplicity. Advanced (or rarely used) options and features are moved to other screens in order to create a cleaner and leaner user interface design that is much easier to take in. An example of this is with Facebook. When users sign up to Facebook the amount of information required is small but once users have signed up they can access the full set of options under the site’s utilities.

Incorporating Workflow into the UI Design

Incorporating workflow into a user user interface design is very much about timing. However useful an option is it must not be prompted before users are ready for it. At the beginning users naturally have a low level of commitment so it is better to first build up credibility. Asking for too much information about users is a perfect example of the need for progressive disclosure. Although more information on a user might allow you to better tailor your services and user interface design you do not want to scare away clients to the willing hands of the competition this trivially. For e-commerce websites, for example, users should be allowed to add items to the cart and purchase without having to sign up first.

Using Wireframes to Incorporate Workflow into a User Interface Design

One of the best ways to ensure great workflow design is to use wireframe software that can create clickable wireframes. The main advantage with clickable wireframes, over plain wireframes (also known as mock ups), is that they provide the most natural way to test workflows. Testers can undergo usability testing of a clickable wireframe as if it were an actual website or application. Wireframes can be created with different user interface designs incorporating various workflow designs allowing UI designers to experiment early on in the development process.

Pidoco.com – Interface Design, Niehaus Wireframe, Wireframe, Wireframe Software, Interface Design Software, User Interface Design, Online Wireframe Tool, Wireframe Tool, Interface Prototyping, Clickable Wireframes, Usability Testing and Digital Paper Prototyping. User centered design for improved UI Design.

Amadeus Consulting Discusses Using Content Strategy to Drive User Experience

The conversation around user experience design is a big one. A large portion of that conversation centers on design elements of user experience (wireframes, user experience audits, graphic considerations), but something often missing from the discussion is content. What about the stuff that people actually write? Both the design elements and the content are equally important to user experience design, but we’re going to zero-in on content, and how the strategy behind it can drive the user to a mutually-beneficial end goal.

While writing this blog, I came across Neha Singh’s article on UX Booth, “Complications with Content,” I had to laugh at the sample conversation she had between a Web Admin and a client, that discussed how simple text and copy tweaks often turn into overall content strategy discussions. I certainly understand how that can go. It gets overwhelming quickly. So where does one start when designing content strategy? And how can it benefit both the user and the company? Below are the first three steps to developing excellent content strategy as part of overall user interface development.

Know your Outcome/Understand your User’s Needs

There is a science and an art to balancing the two of these things. When our team creates a new page, we ask ourselves two questions:

What is the outcome our company is hoping to achieve?

- Give user information

- Drive them to a deeper page

- Have them fill-out an inquiry form

- Purchase item

 

What is the user hoping to achieve with this page?

- Learn more about product

- Speak to someone about more information

- Purchase a product/item

- Learn more about your experience with a product/service

- Drill down to more information or more specific topics

The answers to these two questions can often serve as the basis for your overall content needs.

If you include content that satisfies both your company and your users’ needs, you are on your way to making targeted, consistent relevant content. The way that this drives user experience is that it captures that need that someone is seeking (i.e. Looking for .NET software development? Ooh that’s me!), but doesn’t lose sight of your own objectives.

Templates

Not only do templates save time, they will make sure that you have a consistent content branding strategy across your website. This doesn’t mean that you have to have the exact same layout for each page on your site, but provide a template by sections. Once you answer the two questions above, you’ll know better the visual outlay of your content.  Consistent content layout helps user experience in a variety of ways:

- Ensures consistent branding strategy (already mentioned J)

- Gives credibility across the site, users know what to expect/do (layout outliers tend to look hasty and can confuse the user)

Some text items to consider:

- White space rules (to balance with in-page graphics, reading ease)

- Bullet points to break up text (or make information succinct)

- Tables (Problem/Solution, Products, Qualifications)

- Other Media (Video, Infographics, etc.)

Search Optimization

Believe it or not, enhancing your content with optimized content can be mutually beneficial, and may be one of the most important user experience design elements for content. It is very beneficial for you because adding keywords can enhance your page rankings, increasing the likelihood of people reaching you. Additionally, added in-line links and calls-to-action truly drive people where you want them on your site. It benefits your user by giving users’ specific links and directives, tapping into their need and getting them where they’d like to be.

Keys to getting started:

- Target a specific set of keywords in your content, be creative about how you use them

- Make sure the set of keywords will be relevant to the pages you are creating

- Make sure to give clear calls-to-action (Speak to someone in Business Development)

 

Feel free to leave comments and questions below about user interface development.

About Lisa Calkins

Lisa Calkins, Amadeus Consulting’s CEO and Co-Founder, is also the Director of Creative Services. Lisa is dedicated to the infusion of creativity into every aspect of Amadeus Consulting, including our custom software application design.

 

Find More User Experience Design Articles

Amadeus Consulting Discusses Using Minimal Content to Drive Mobile User Experience Design

As we discussed in our previous post “Using Content Strategy to Drive User Experience,” we talked about the importance of content in driving user experience design. But what does one do if you are talking content for mobile app development or mobile site design? Content is (or should be) decidedly limited, and therefore needs special considerations.

Designing the content for mobile applications is something we have become quite good at in a short period of time. Our mobile application developers are close to reaching their 50th application (iPhone™, Android™, BlackBerry® and Windows Phone™ applications) in the span of about a year and a half. At the beginning we did not quite know how to handle this new content scenario, but we have rapidly learned what works and what is simply too wordy.

Here are some considerations when designing content for mobile applications:

Convey Actions/Directives

When it comes to mobile apps, people like to be told what to do. Not in a negative way, but in a way that allows them to never be confused about their next action. Verbs with a noun or short adjective can go a long way, and are really the only things the people need to guide them.

Stick to phrases like:

Play New Game

Email Us!

Login

These may sound basic, but simple is better when navigating.

Minimalism & Focus

In his article, “What Websites can learn from Mobile,” Michael Wilson brings up a great point that seems so simple and obvious, but is often overlooked in mobile application development. When people user their smartphones, they are rarely just browsing. Rather, they are rather focused on a specific task.

Smartphones really aren’t set up for effective and easy browsing and that often gets forgotten. This means that people try to throw everything but the kitchen sink into an app or a mobile site, leaving the user to sift through several levels of content till they get where they need to go.

Something that helps minimize the amount of content needed is to think about how someone is using your application. By the time they reach it, they will already know what they want to accomplish, and there is little need for wordy explanation.

Not only will focusing the function of the application to include a core set of functions benefit the flow of the overall application, but it will also make your content much easier to use. It will break it down to the functions and actions that make navigating so much easier.

Instructions/Storylines

The only place where wordiness might work is in instruction sections, about the application, or storylines that are critical explanations of the mobile application. This often occurs when creating mobile apps for games, or critical applications like banking or finance (times where people get nervous about what they are seeing). Take a note from mobile app development companies like Rovio, who developed Angry Birds. Instead of explanation they give a cool mini-video teaser as the backstory for the application.

If it is necessary to have paragraphs of information, try to make it the least intrusive. One explanatory paragraph before the user begins the function of the application. If further explanation is needed once in the application, try making info bubbles. These would be buttons for them to click on if they want more information, but won’t pop up until the user has need for them.

The same rule that applies with search results applies with content; you will probably lose many people after the first scroll, so keep it as brief as possible. If you find yourself writing too many of these, it might be time to reconsider the core function of the application. Think about it this way: if it requires too much backstory or explanation, it is probably too complicated for most users.

Does it fit in a button?

Now that question can be subjective depending on the size/need of a button, but if the text of your button requires two lines or more, you know the content might be too long. Use this as a litmus test to determine whether you are being too wordy or not.

Feel free to share your best practices when it comes to creation of content for mobile applications in the comment section, and follow up with our team if you are interested in mobile app development.

 

About Lisa Calkins

Lisa Calkins, Amadeus Consulting’s CEO and Co-Founder, is also the Director of Creative Services. Lisa is dedicated to the infusion of creativity into every aspect of Amadeus Consulting, including our custom software application design.

Amadeus Consulting Discusses Using Minimal Content to Drive Mobile User Experience Design

As we discussed in our previous post “Using Content Strategy to Drive User Experience,” we talked about the importance of content in driving user experience design. But what does one do if you are talking content for mobile app development or mobile site design? Content is (or should be) decidedly limited, and therefore needs special considerations.

Designing the content for mobile applications is something we have become quite good at in a short period of time. Our mobile application developers are close to reaching their 50th application (iPhone™, Android™, BlackBerry® and Windows Phone™ applications) in the span of about a year and a half. At the beginning we did not quite know how to handle this new content scenario, but we have rapidly learned what works and what is simply too wordy.

Here are some considerations when designing content for mobile applications:

Convey Actions/Directives

When it comes to mobile apps, people like to be told what to do. Not in a negative way, but in a way that allows them to never be confused about their next action. Verbs with a noun or short adjective can go a long way, and are really the only things the people need to guide them.

Stick to phrases like:

Play New Game

Email Us!

Login

These may sound basic, but simple is better when navigating.

Minimalism & Focus

In his article, “What Websites can learn from Mobile,” Michael Wilson brings up a great point that seems so simple and obvious, but is often overlooked in mobile application development. When people user their smartphones, they are rarely just browsing. Rather, they are rather focused on a specific task.

Smartphones really aren’t set up for effective and easy browsing and that often gets forgotten. This means that people try to throw everything but the kitchen sink into an app or a mobile site, leaving the user to sift through several levels of content till they get where they need to go.

Something that helps minimize the amount of content needed is to think about how someone is using your application. By the time they reach it, they will already know what they want to accomplish, and there is little need for wordy explanation.

Not only will focusing the function of the application to include a core set of functions benefit the flow of the overall application, but it will also make your content much easier to use. It will break it down to the functions and actions that make navigating so much easier.

Instructions/Storylines

The only place where wordiness might work is in instruction sections, about the application, or storylines that are critical explanations of the mobile application. This often occurs when creating mobile apps for games, or critical applications like banking or finance (times where people get nervous about what they are seeing). Take a note from mobile app development companies like Rovio, who developed Angry Birds. Instead of explanation they give a cool mini-video teaser as the backstory for the application.

If it is necessary to have paragraphs of information, try to make it the least intrusive. One explanatory paragraph before the user begins the function of the application. If further explanation is needed once in the application, try making info bubbles. These would be buttons for them to click on if they want more information, but won’t pop up until the user has need for them.

The same rule that applies with search results applies with content; you will probably lose many people after the first scroll, so keep it as brief as possible. If you find yourself writing too many of these, it might be time to reconsider the core function of the application. Think about it this way: if it requires too much backstory or explanation, it is probably too complicated for most users.

Does it fit in a button?

Now that question can be subjective depending on the size/need of a button, but if the text of your button requires two lines or more, you know the content might be too long. Use this as a litmus test to determine whether you are being too wordy or not.

Feel free to share your best practices when it comes to creation of content for mobile applications in the comment section, and follow up with our team if you are interested in mobile app development.

 

About Lisa Calkins

Lisa Calkins, Amadeus Consulting’s CEO and Co-Founder, is also the Director of Creative Services. Lisa is dedicated to the infusion of creativity into every aspect of Amadeus Consulting, including our custom software application design.

More User Experience Design Articles

Amadeus Consulting Discusses Using Minimal Content to Drive Mobile User Experience Design

As we discussed in our previous post “Using Content Strategy to Drive User Experience,” we talked about the importance of content in driving user experience design. But what does one do if you are talking content for mobile app development or mobile site design? Content is (or should be) decidedly limited, and therefore needs special considerations.

Designing the content for mobile applications is something we have become quite good at in a short period of time. Our mobile application developers are close to reaching their 50th application (iPhone™, Android™, BlackBerry® and Windows Phone™ applications) in the span of about a year and a half. At the beginning we did not quite know how to handle this new content scenario, but we have rapidly learned what works and what is simply too wordy.

Here are some considerations when designing content for mobile applications:

Convey Actions/Directives

When it comes to mobile apps, people like to be told what to do. Not in a negative way, but in a way that allows them to never be confused about their next action. Verbs with a noun or short adjective can go a long way, and are really the only things the people need to guide them.

Stick to phrases like:

Play New Game

Email Us!

Login

These may sound basic, but simple is better when navigating.

Minimalism & Focus

In his article, “What Websites can learn from Mobile,” Michael Wilson brings up a great point that seems so simple and obvious, but is often overlooked in mobile application development. When people user their smartphones, they are rarely just browsing. Rather, they are rather focused on a specific task.

Smartphones really aren’t set up for effective and easy browsing and that often gets forgotten. This means that people try to throw everything but the kitchen sink into an app or a mobile site, leaving the user to sift through several levels of content till they get where they need to go.

Something that helps minimize the amount of content needed is to think about how someone is using your application. By the time they reach it, they will already know what they want to accomplish, and there is little need for wordy explanation.

Not only will focusing the function of the application to include a core set of functions benefit the flow of the overall application, but it will also make your content much easier to use. It will break it down to the functions and actions that make navigating so much easier.

Instructions/Storylines

The only place where wordiness might work is in instruction sections, about the application, or storylines that are critical explanations of the mobile application. This often occurs when creating mobile apps for games, or critical applications like banking or finance (times where people get nervous about what they are seeing). Take a note from mobile app development companies like Rovio, who developed Angry Birds. Instead of explanation they give a cool mini-video teaser as the backstory for the application.

If it is necessary to have paragraphs of information, try to make it the least intrusive. One explanatory paragraph before the user begins the function of the application. If further explanation is needed once in the application, try making info bubbles. These would be buttons for them to click on if they want more information, but won’t pop up until the user has need for them.

The same rule that applies with search results applies with content; you will probably lose many people after the first scroll, so keep it as brief as possible. If you find yourself writing too many of these, it might be time to reconsider the core function of the application. Think about it this way: if it requires too much backstory or explanation, it is probably too complicated for most users.

Does it fit in a button?

Now that question can be subjective depending on the size/need of a button, but if the text of your button requires two lines or more, you know the content might be too long. Use this as a litmus test to determine whether you are being too wordy or not.

Feel free to share your best practices when it comes to creation of content for mobile applications in the comment section, and follow up with our team if you are interested in mobile app development.

 

About Lisa Calkins

Lisa Calkins, Amadeus Consulting’s CEO and Co-Founder, is also the Director of Creative Services. Lisa is dedicated to the infusion of creativity into every aspect of Amadeus Consulting, including our custom software application design.

Find More User Experience Design Articles

Web App Performance Testing Using WebDriver


By Michael Klepikov Web UI responsiveness is a very important part of great user experience. At the same time, it could be hard to achieve and easy to inadvertently break, as it is affected by a great number of nontrivial factors — variable network latency, browser-specific rendering algorithms, JavaScript garbage collection, to name a few. This talk (or workshop?) will focus on automated performance and latency testing for web frontends, using WebDriver. I will present best practices for measuring performance and latency, automating the tests to get reliable and repeatable results, and making sense of the data. We will also explore ways to monitor how the app performs for real users.

Delivering Professional Quality Webcasts using Lync Online — Lync and Learn Session


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FluidPaint: An Interactive Digital Painting System using Real Wet Brushes


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Fireworks CS6: Creating HTML pages using CSS Sprites | lynda.com


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